Southern NH

Southern NH

Tucker & French Family Forest, Kingston

33 Marshall Rd
Kingston  New Hampshire  03848
United States

Easy

80%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

5%

Description

The Tucker & French Family Forest in the towns of Kingston, Danville & Brentwood 589 acres hold about 7 miles of trails.  Don't ecpect technical challenges here. These trails are perfect for a family outing or just a pleasant ride.

The forest is a Southeast Land Trust of New Hampshire Property and an excellent description of how the property came to be is on their website.

There are multiple trailheads, as can be seen on the maps above.

  Read more about Tucker & French Family Forest, Kingston

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Southern NH

Wasserman Park, Merrimack

116 Naticook Rd
Merrimack  New Hampshire  03054
United States

Easy

30%

Moderate

80%

Difficult

10%

Description

Wasserman Park is one of Merrimack's best known recreation areas. It has a dog park, a playground , tennis courts, playing fields and miles of trails. Wasserman's 46 acres directly abut the town's 87 acre Wasserman Conservation Area. But most poeple refer to both as Wasserman Park. Wasserman also has a sandy beach, though it's only open to Merrimack residents.

Wasserman has many miles of well maintained trails. One, the Quarry Trail, leads to the nearby Horse Hill Nature Preserve. A 563 acre property that itself hosts about 15 miles of trails. Attempting to do both in one day would be a heroic undetaking. The Gilmore Hill Memorial Forest can also be reached from Wasserman.

Wasserman's trails, especially the singletracks are tight, interesting and fun. Quite a bit of trail work has gone into them and this will be obvious as you explore them.

The best place to park is at the Dog Park parking lot. From there head back towards the Park's entry road, cross it by the Park & Recreation Office, and at the end of the Resident's Parking Lot look for a trail going into the woods. (See the map above on the right.)

You'll enjoy Wasserman Park. The trails will bring you back again and again. Oh! And almost every one of them are just as much fun to ride in both direction. Read more about Wasserman Park, Merrimack

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SNH NEMBA Mine Falls Coed Novice Ride

Event Date

Repeats every week every Tuesday 52 times except Tue Jun 15 2021.
5/18/21 6:00pm

SNH NEMBA Coed Novice Ride


Details: This is a no drop, no pressure, fun ride!

Time: 6 PM

Location:  **New Meeting Location for 2021**

We will be meetingin the back left parking lot at the end of Stadium Drive. (Off Route 3, Exit 5), - This is the street that the Nashua YMCA and Stellos Stadium are on.

The correct parking lot is to the right of the YMCA and to the left of Stellos Stadium.

Be on the lookout for a blue Ford Explorer SUV as we'll meet there for a pre-ride discussion. 

  Try to get there a bit early so that we can get the ride off at 6:00 PM.

There are only three things required for for this novice ride: a bike that is capable of riding on hard packed dirt, a helmet (no exceptions), and a desire to have a great time.

Feel free to email me if you have any questions.

  To sign up for this ride you must use this Eventbrite link as we are putting limits on the number of attendees. 

Note: When the weather allows this ride turns into a Fat Bike Ride in the winter.

Be sure to sign NEMBA's 2021 waiver ahead of time.  It's good for the whole year.

Chris Gaudet
SNH NEMBA Novice Ride Leader
 
Mine Falls Park | New Hampshire Trails | TrailLink  New Hampshire...Love it or Leaf it: Biking Mine Falls Park in Nashua  Mountain Biking | Programs | Campus Recreation | UMass Lowell  Mine Falls Park – New Hampshire Stock Photography and Scenic Images
 
 

Location

Mine Falls, Nashua NH

Chapter

State

New Hampshire

Ride Level

Beginner

Ride Style

XC

Ride Leader Name

Chris Gaudet
978-807-9322

Southern NH

Stratham Hill

255 Portsmouth Ave
Stratham  New Hampshire  03885
United States
Parki at the Stratham Hill Park parking lot.

Easy

25%

Moderate

70%

Difficult

5%

Description

Plenty of single track, wide open tractor roads and some solid climbing… a place for everyone to ride!

Most riders who come to ride the trails at 'Stratham Hill' don't realize that they are riding on both private and public land.  The Town Park, Stratham Hill Park, and the Gordon Barker Town forest are just over 200 acres of land, about half of that is either open field or wetlands. The rest of the trail network weaves in and out of privately owned land.  There about 10 miles of trails, the riding is fast and not very technical. There are three hills (Stratham, Jewell and Long) that can get the heart rate up and offer a sweet reward on the other side. If you are looking for a route to ride with the kids, just check out a topographical map before heading out, as long as you bypass those hills, you should be good to go.  

Even though there are multiple trailheads, the most popular place to park and meet up is at the end of Jack Rabbit Lane, just off of Portsmouth Avenue.  This parking lot has morphed into the 'dog area' in recent years, but is has proven to be a great place to start your ride. Not too far from the parking area, there is an incredible dirt pump track for getting warmed up for your ride (or while you wait for your buddies). This dirt track is great for kids to learn some basic biking skills and is open to the public for use. It's one of if not the bggest one in New England and it's very popular.

The trails throughout the network vary in difficulty. There are wide open 'tractor' and old logging roads, to single track climbs. With proper planning the riding can be geared towards all abilities. The Town is in the process of creating a new trail map. Once complete it will be available for down load at strathamnh.gov/ recreation.  The trails are open nearly year round. If Mother Nature cooperates the Town grooms some of the trails that are wide enough and not too steep.  There needs to be at least 6 inches of snow on the ground for grooming to be effective.

The Town also owns a small fleet of Trek Farley 5's and two Trek kids Farley's. Visit the Parks and Recreation website for more information. The Department rents these bikes whenever the trails are rideable. The cost is $25 for a three hour block. Having these bikes right there is a great way to try a fat bike and not have to worry about getting it to the trailhead.

There are a variety of organized events throughout the year. There are races, social rides and events for the family. For the last few winters, the Park has played host to the Polartec Winter Fat Bike Series, the Stratham Parks and Recreation Summer Bike series and the Gordon Barker "No Brakes" Bike Race. If you do more than just ride the trails, new this year there is a trail running series in May and the Fire Tower trail race in August.  The series races are typically on Thursday nights. This year will be offering wood fired pizza, so bring the family and make an evening of it. Later in the cycling season we will create a Cyclecross course that will stay up as a practice area.

The Park also hosts the annual Seacoast Velo Kids, 'Take a Kid Mountain Biking Day'. This year's event will be on May 15th. This is a great way to get the kids out early, dust off their skills (and yours) at the skill stations, cruise around the kids race course and get some free schwag. Through the months of July and August Seacoast Velo Kids offers group rides for kids at the Park on Sunday afternoons. They have some loaner bikes if the kids need to borrow one. Check out their website for registration details, seacoastvelokids.org .
The Town of Stratham organizes different volunteer groups to assist with the necessary maintenance of all of the trails. There are ongoing efforts to update and replace some of the bridges and other manmade structures to make the riding experience more enjoyable.  If you are interested in getting involved with these efforts, please send us an email at .

Getting to the trails in Stratham is rather easy and very convenient.   The Park is located just a few minutes off of Interstate 95 and New Hampshire State Highway 101, under an hour from Boston, Concord, NH and Portland.  Dogs must be leashed in certain areas on the trails, please obey the posted signs. The trails on Town owned land close to the public at 9 pm.  We hope to see you out there soon! Read more about Stratham Hill

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Southern NH

Drummer Hill & Goose Pond, Keene

19 Drummer Rd
Keene  New Hampshire  03431
United States

Easy

20%

Moderate

60%

Difficult

20%

Description

Welcome to Drummer Hill, Keene’s most extensive singletrack destination! You’ll find many hours of intermediate- through expert-level riding, consisting of mostly unsanitized, gnarly roots and rocks (and reggae!) in a base of sweet, tacky soil that knobbies will dig. On a fatbike in winter when the snow settles into a solid base, the singletrack becomes superfluous and you’ll discover the true meaning of “cross country” as the entire woods become a paved playground.

The published maps of Keene show a roughly 4 square mile area called “Goose Pond Forest” which includes Goose Pond and the slopes and ridge that rise above to the east, Minister’s Lot, Drummer Hill, and adjacent regions of mixed private and public lands. With more than 18 miles of singletrack and 13 miles of unimproved doubletrack trails, it’s a local wilderness seeker’s dream. The trails are used year-round for mountain biking, hiking, running, fatbiking, snowshoeing, and skiing, and some of the doubletrack is included the New England Interstate Snowmobile Corridor routes. The Drummer Hill area also connects to another, unmapped, singletrack system in the adjacent townships of Gilsum and Surry which can be accessed without riding on any paved roads. All told, perhaps as many as ten hours of saddle time could be enjoyed with relatively little backtracking.

There are four gated access parking areas to the trails: the corner of Drummer and Greenacres Roads, Timberlane Dr., Meetinghouse Road, and the Goose Pond parking area off of Rt. 12A (W. Surry Rd.)

Most of the trails are on southwest facing slopes and run downhill from approximately east to west. The Brattleboro/Keene Chapter of the New England Mountain Biking Association is responsible for maintaining the trails and map. As of this writing the trails are not signed, but the entire system will be signed during the spring of 2015. From the map you’ll see that most of the trails are on public-access land with some going across unposted private land. The trails include drops of 1 – 20 feet, all with go-arounds---so look ahead, keep relaxed, and stay healthy!

From the parking area at Drummer & Greenacres Roads to the 1148 ft. summit of Bitten Trail (built circa 1988) is a climb of just over 600 vertical feet. Right away you’ll get a taste of typical Drummer singletrack with its often off-camber, technical twists and turns. Although there is no beginner-level singletrack in Drummer, three doubletrack dirt fire roads, Old Gilsum, Lower Drummer and Wild Things, provide entry-level riders with a good place to start and begin exploring the singletrack. Of course, riders of all abilities should use common sense and dismount and walk when in doubt.

Maps can be downloaded and printed from the top of this webpage, and viewed online at Trailforks (http://www.trailforks.com/region/drummer-hill-goose-pond/). With map in hand visitors can plan their adventure, a few of which are described below. Please ride with excellent trail and wilderness etiquette, and enjoy!

When reading about the “rides” that follow, please refer to the map. Most of the trails are “New England intermediate”, but include at least short sections that are advanced: keep your eyes ahead and be mindful of drops, narrow bridges, random branches, and newts.

The following ride narrative begins at the Drummer/Greenacres Road gate on Rope Tow Rd, but any of the trailheads can be optioned for both start and finish. Riding in a new area inevitably brings up conflicts at the interface of map/signage/rider, so keep a map handy, or expect to enjoy moments of being “lost”. Two prominent landmarks are the steel and wooden poled power lines which intersect each other, running northwest-southeast, and northeast-southwest, respectively. If you ever feel completely 'lost', just keep heading west to get back to Keene. All times are given as guesstimated ranges.
 
From the gate, ride Rope Tow Rd. for about 100 feet and turn right onto the beginning of Jump Trail. Cross the creek and turn left to continue climbing Jump (straight on is Dog Walk Tr.) Continue up Jump and turn left at the intersection to continue toward Lewis Pond and up Kamakazi Slalom Tr., continuing onto Crossover, Goat, and across Lower Drummer Rd. Continue up Goat, and after a total of 10-20 minutes of climbing since starting, turn left to continue north on Old Gilsum Rd. At some point during the Summer of 2015 it is expected that the excellent singletrack sections of Bitten and Threader Trails east of Old Gilsum Rd. will reopen, but they are currently closed for logging – when they do reopen, you could turn right and climb Bitten Trail. But for now, continue north on Old Gilsum Rd. for 5-10 minutes and turn right at the intersection with NH Snowmobile Corridor 6. Continue climbing under the steel powerlines and in 5-10 minutes, turn right onto Back Door Trail. As you come out of the heavily logged trees to the wooden powerline, turn right, and after about 100 feet, turn left to continue to the 1148’ summit of Bitten. This entire route takes 20-45 minutes from start. At this juncture there are 3 options: (1) down Clevis/Threader, one Drummer’s most rocky and technical lines; (2) down the less technical Bitten Trail; or (3) backtrack on Back Door, the least technical of these options. The first two options drop back to Old Gilsum Rd in about 5-15 minutes, and continue (see map options) down to Lower Drummer Rd., and from there, you’ll see a few mapped options down to the cul-de-sac road - for a total of 10-15 minutes of downhill thrills from the top of Bitten to the cul-de-sac.

If you choose the 3rd option, backtrack on Back Door and when you get back to the Snowmobile Corridor, continue straight across onto Exit 1 Trail. Turn right at Old Woods Rd, and in about 60 feet, turn left onto Exit 2 Trail. Exits 1 & 2 together take 15-25 minutes.        

Exit 2 ends at Old Gilsum Rd, with several options. The “north end” trails, described below, all begin here and wind down toward the creek crossing on Far Side Trail. Turn left off Exit 2 onto Old Gilsum, and after 50 feet, turn right onto the most advanced of these trails, Drop and Chute. Or turn right, ride about 100 feet, and turn left onto 48T Trail - “48T” stands for 48, mostly tight and often off-camber, very sweet Turns. Or, instead of 48T, continue north on Old Gilsum about 400 feet and turn left onto the Far Side Spur. Or instead of the Spur, continue north on Old Gilsum Rd., maybe a half mile, to the upper Far Side Trailhead on the left. Each of these ‘north end’ trails takes anywhere from 5 – 20 minutes to get down to the Far Side Trail creek crossing. From the intersection of 48 T and Far Side, either of these trails can be ridden back up to Old Gilsum Rd., and another taken back down, repeatedly. The only one of these trails that is “one-way” is down Drop and Chute.

Onve down to the creek at the bottom of Far Side, continue across the creek (caution!), and up to the steel power lines. From here you can go up either Mike’s trail or the Red on White 4-track, the fastest way back to Old Gilsum Rd., or, continue west from the powerline for about 200 ft and turn left onto Labyrinth - a fast and wild 10-20 minute, mostly “descending with grin” trail that ends up at Goose Pond.

Once at Goose Pond you can go right (easiest) or left. On the map, you’ll see the Goose Pond parking area, and also how you can make your way to Wild Things, which leads back to the cul-de-sac road in 5–15 minutes. Turning right at the end of Wild Things is a good place to bail if you want an easy out back to Drummer Rd/Green Acres. Or instead, turn left on the cul-de-sac road, continue straight on. There are 3 climbing options here: turn right on Butter, or go a little further and turn right to climb lowest Goat, or continue past Goat onto lowest Bitten (aka, “Bridges”). All three of these latter options bring you back up to Lower Drummer Rd. Once you get a feel for how these “south end” trails are laid out, you can explore others, or head back down to start in about 5-10 minutes – the map shows several routes. Another option here, on Lower Drummer Rd., is to climb the next section of Bitten or Goat back to Old Gilsum Rd.            

Other trails you’ll want to ride now or next time include: Jump, Double-Drop, and Threader – all of which include some extreme sections, but again, with go-arounds.

By Bob Shalit
  Read more about Drummer Hill & Goose Pond, Keene

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Bear Brook progress statement

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Leaders from SNH NEMBA (Matt Caron, Kathy Evans, Peter DeSantis and Dan Sloan) and NEMBA’s director, Philip Keyes, met with DRED’s director of Parks & Recreation, the bureau chief of trail, the foresters for the region, the land manager, regional supervisor and a representative from the division of forestry.

The purpose of the meeting was have DRED re-open the Bear Brook extension trail that parallels One Mile Road and to get SNH NEMBA’s 5-year trail plan for the park back on track. We’re pleased to report that DRED will be fast-tracking the process of re-opening the trail and will be reviewing the specifics of the next elements of the 5-year plan so that this plan is coordinated along with input from other user groups.

According to DRED, they were faced with a dilemma about re-opening the trail after the logging because the trail was not on their recreation map (though it was on a 1991 forestry resource map). Since the trail is not officially recognized, DRED must submit it to State Land Management Team for review. This will take place at the committee’s next meeting on the 1st Tuesday in June. DRED leadership believes that authorizing this trail to become part of the official trail inventory at Bear Brook should not be a problem.

We thank everyone for communicating with DRED, and we’re optimistic that the trail will be re-opened.

 
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Southern NH

Horse Hill Nature Preserve, Merrimack

184 Amherst Rd
Merrimack  New Hampshire  03054
United States

Easy

40%

Moderate

45%

Difficult

15%

Description

Permitted Activities:
Hiking, biking, cross country skiing, snowshoeing, hunting, and snowmobile and horseback riding.

Not Permitted Activities:
ATV use and Target Shooting is expressly prohibited.

The 563± acre property consists of gently rolling to fairly steep terrain and two hills approximately 400' elevation.  The land was cleared for pasture many years ago, it has been logged several times, and now consists primarily of mixed hardwood forest with trees between 20 and 60 years of age.  The property includes a series of streams, ponds, swamps, and numerous wetlands totaling approximately 60 acres.  The varied terrain, habitat, and large areas of undisturbed open space have encouraged a wide variety of wildlife to thrive on the property.

Trails:
The trails are 30% doubletrack and 70% singletrack. There are two large hills (Horse Hill and Blodgett Hill) with several routes up and down each allowing for multiple loops.  If you stay on the loop trail right out of the Amherst Rd parking lot the trails are relatively flat and suitable for a novice rider.  Loop will give you roughly 4.5 miles and give you a few challenges to test your skills.  There are a few singletrack trails you don’t want to miss if you are looking for some tech, Outer Ledges, Twister and East Slope.  There are also many unmarked trails, so if you can score a guide to bring you around, do it.  Horse Hill has many beaver ponds within the 560 acres so if it rains, give it time to dry out.

There is another group of trails on the other side of Naticook Road using Quarry Trail that are commonly referred to as the Greens Pond / Wasserman Park trails. Total mileage at Horse Hill is around 12+ miles, 15-20 miles if you cross Naticook. The largest parking lot is at 184 Amherst Road in Merrimack, NH and you can print a trail map from merrimackoutdoors.org

Unique/Historic Features:
The Preserve takes its name from Horse Hill, one of two 400' hills located within the Preserve. Blodgett Hill, the highest point within the Preserve, is named for the Blodgett family who were early settlers of this part of Merrimack. The Spalding family were also early settlers, and the foundation of the house of a Captain Spalding is located in the Preserve. Numerous stone walls still mark the one time farming activities of these two families. Two hand dug, stone lined, wells are located on the property. One of these wells is still in use today. A well preserved portion of Old Kings Highway, a Colonial road which once ran from Keene to Portsmouth, crosses the southeast corner of the Preserve.

Horse Hill has a dedicated group of trail workers including many from Southern NH NEMBA that keep things clean and ever expanding.  Many of them also groom the singletrack in the winter for Fat Biking so it has become a premiere fat bike spot.  HH also hosts all day dog walking, snow shoe races, Audubon Society hikes, scouting hikes, and geocaching events.

Come and enjoy this little gem tucked between Nashua and Manchester Read more about Horse Hill Nature Preserve, Merrimack

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Southern NH

Mayflower Hill, Milford

100 Shady Lane
Milford  New Hampshire  03055
United States

Easy

70%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

15%

Description

Mayflower Hill is a great place to ride when you have very little time.  The trail starts with a great hill climb and then makes a loop around the top of Mayflower Hill.  This 35 acre area is the home of many old quarries that are small in size.  There is also a beautiful lookout over looking Temple, Pack and North Pack Monadnock. This is a great place to go at sunset! There are many other trails in this area,Mayflower Hill itself having about 1 mile of trails, but please be aware that many of them are on private property so please respect the “No Trespassing” signs.

 

Notes:

The town forest is open to hunting. Be sure to wear orange in the fall.  Please be respectful to others using the trails.  The town forest joins mainly parcels of private land. Please be sure to stay off of land that is posted no trespassing.

Mayflower Hill is owned by the town of Milford and managed and maintained by the Milford Conservation Commission.

By Peter DeSantis & Beth Woodbury
Taken from their book
Get out and Mountain Bike! Southern New Hampshire.
© Copyright 2005 Read more about Mayflower Hill, Milford

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Southern NH

Tucker Brook Town Forest, Milford

221 Savage Rd
Milford  New Hampshire  03055
United States

Easy

70%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

15%

Description

Locations:

221 Savage Rd., Milford NH, South Section
68 Whitten Rd. Milford NH, North section

Description:

Tucker Brook Town Forest is a 258 acre conservation area with many multi-use recreation trails.  Tucker Brook runs through the property and the trails cross the brook at various points.  The forest has many wetlands and White Pine groves.  Be sure to see the Tucker Brook Falls and look for sections of trail along the brook that have many glacial erratics. The trails are mostly single track and hilly.  There are few technical spots, but all are walkable. Some of the trails are marked while others are not.  If you get lost, remember that Savage Road runs to your west and Route 101 bypass is to your east.  The trails all end up on local roads close to where you parked. In all there are about 10 miles of trails at Tucker Brook.

Notes:

The town forest is open to hunting. Be sure to wear orange in the fall.  Please be respectful to others using the trails.  The town forest joins mainly parcels of private land. Please be sure to stay off of land that is posted no trespassing.

Directions:


Trail Head South: 221 Savage Rd.
Turn off of the Route 101 bypass by the Milford DMV onto Old Wilton Road.  Bear right as the road changes to Savage Road.  Go about 0.3 miles from the “Y” and park under the power lines on the left.  The trailhead is 200 feet up the road on the left.

Tucker Brook North: 68 Whitten Rd.
Turn off of the Route 101 bypass by the Milford DMV onto Old Wilton Road.  Bear left onto Whitten Road Park on the left just after going over the bridge for Tucker Brook.

Tucker Brook is owned by the town of Milford and managed and maintained by the Milford Conservation Commission.

By Peter DeSantis & Beth Woodbury
Taken from their book
Get out and Mountain Bike! Southern New Hampshire.
© Copyright 2005 Read more about Tucker Brook Town Forest, Milford

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Southern NH

Salem Town Forest

56 Shadow Lake RD
Salem  New Hampshire  03079
United States

Easy

70%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

15%

Description

Salem Town Forest

An area totaling nearly 200 acres, the Salem Town Forest offers year round recreation.

The parking lot is large and a kiosk at the entrance has a detailed map with a brief history of the area.

There about 5 miles of trail within the forest, and an additional 5 miles on neighboring private property. Those trails can be accessed from the end of Trail A (boundary not marked).

The area has some steep hills with a few minor rocky, technical sections. Trail A is the best for beginners, offering a flat ride past the wetlands.

Trail H is a steeper, but fun, intermediate level trail.

Please stay on the marked trails and do not create new trails.

 

Directions:

56 Shadow Lake Road
Route 93 Exit 3. East on Route 111. Cross Route 28 and continue 0.7 miles.  Park in lot on the right, after the State highway maintenance area.

Owned/Managed: Town of Salem
Maintained by: Salem Conservation Commission   

By Peter DeSantis & Beth Woodbury
Taken from their book
Get Out and Mountain Bike! Southern New Hampshire.
© Copyright 2005

Salem Town Forest Trails Cleanup Day | Nature Groupie  Salem Town Forest, 48 Shadow Lake Rd, Salem, NH 03079, USA Read more about Salem Town Forest

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