Southeast MA

Southeast MA

Cataumet Greenway & Red Brook Pond

1 Post Office Square
Bourne  Massachusetts  02534
United States

Easy

30%

Moderate

67%

Difficult

3%

Description

The Cataumet Greenway at 95 acres is a small area that's dense with trails. About 5 miles if you ride everything.

The trails are almost all winding, flowing non-technical singletracks. All are fun to ride no matter which direction you choose to ride them in. Normally I'll ride most of them in both direstions.

At 30 acres Red Brook Pond is a nearby about 1/4 mile away on Shore road. 

The best place to park to ride both is near Cataumet's Post Office. You'll see a parking area, playground and trailhead in the same complex.

A good description of both is this one, taken from the Bourne Conservation Trust's Website.

Cataumet Greenway, approximately 95 acres, is comprised of several parcels joined together to provide a network of trails through varying habitats. It is home to numerous species of wild animals and a variety or wildflowers. A sheep trench from an era gone by can still be seen at various point along the trail. Included is Red Brook Pond Conservation Area, Cataumet Center, and Lawrence Island.

A GPX file for a good ride linking the two areas is at the top of this page.  It can be downloaded into your phone or other GPX device. 

The Greenway's trails are really fun to ride. They flow and you never seem to going in a straight line for more that a few seconds at at time. The trails here nicely branch the difference between beginner and intermediate so most everyone will enjoy them.

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Cape Cod NEMBA Monday Women's Ride

Event Date

Repeats every week every Monday until Mon Sep 13 2021 .
3/29/21 5:30pm

Calling all ladies!

Monday nights are girls night out!

Women’s mountain bike ride starting at 5:30.

For directions to the start contact me @   

We will be exploring some of the Greenough trails, sometimes down to Gray's beach.

The ride will probably be 11-12 ish miles depending on levels of riders, a couple of these miles are on the road to get to all the trails.

This ride is intended for intermediate level women riders. Not suitable for beginners. The expected length makes it too much for new riders.

There are plenty of break stops and lots of opportunities to take scennic photos.

I would like to incorporate some skills drills/ sessions into these rides if anyone is interested.

NO DROP. This ride is to get more women loving (or even comfortable) with mountain biking and having fun.

Let me know who is interested so I have an idea how many people are going to show.

Hope to see you there!

   Contact me, Karen Zunti with any questions and to see if this week's ride is on.     

Save time by signing NEMBA's 2021 Waiver ahead of time. But you only have to sign it once. Read more about [node:title]

Chapter

State

Massachusetts

Ride Level

Intermediate
All Levels

Ride Types

Ride Style

XC

Ride Leader Name

Karen Zunti

Southeast MA

Bird Street Conservation Area, Stoughton

1258 West St
Stoughton  Massachusetts  02072
United States

Easy

30%

Moderate

55%

Difficult

15%

Description

The Bird Street Conservation Land is part of Stoughton's Memorial Conservation Land and is about 675 acres. Additionally, the Ames Rifle Club Trail, which is a stand-alone trail in Stoughton but a great connector, is included in this region. These are all fun and easy to intermediate trails that all levels of riders can enjoy. This can be a fantastic fat biking area as it's fairly level and not much hiking use in the winter.

Many of the trails are marked with colored markers blue, green, yellow and orange and can be aeen on this map. There is a super interesting history in this region that includes the Myron Gilbert quarries, the Roy Robinson Loop Trail, as well as the Storybook Trail, a 2008 Eagle Scout project that has been well maintained. These trails are maintained by SEMASS NEMBA and the Stoughton Conservation Commission.

In all there are about 10 miles of trails to explore. There is not too much technical riding but the region does include a challenging 50' skinny bridge as well as a short Ledge trail for the expert riders. This is a great area to ride if you know a new mountain biker that wants to work on their skills.

The Ames Rifle Descent Trail is an outlier in the Stoughton area so it is included here. A short and easy road ride by Ames Long Pond from Palisades Circle Parking Area gets you to the trailhead where there is parking for 10 or more vehicles. Most people ride this trail west to east but it's actually a great trail in both directions. This trail gets you close to the Rattlesnake Hill area of Sharon (Conservation Land acquired in 2019) which can connect you to Borderland State Park & King Philip for even more tremendous riding options.

There are two parking areas. One at 90 Bird Street is small holding only a car or two. The best one is at the Bradley Lessa Memorial playground at 1258 West Street. It's much larger and a better entry point for the trails.

I'd suggest bringing a copy of the above maps. Some of the trails in the southern part og Bird Street can be wet in all but the dryest of seasons.

You'll find a lot more trails than are on either of these maps.

Other than locals, few people are aware of or have explored these trails.  You can be among them.

 

Masstrails.com - Stoughton Bird Street Conservation Area Loop - Massachusetts | AllTrails Photo Gallery: A Tour of the Bird Street Conservation Area | Stoughton, MA  Patch

Be sure to read the trail descriptions at the bottom of this MAP. Read more about [node:title]

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Southeast MA

Nickerson State Park, Brewster

3488 Main Street
Brewster  Massachusetts  02631
United States

508-896-3491

Easy

30%

Moderate

60%

Difficult

10%

Description

Nickerson State Park is located in the middle of Cape Cod just about where the peninsula begins to dog-leg north. Nickerson’s 1900 acres host about 400 campsites, and eight ponds. Oddly no streams or rivers feed these ponds and they are all interconnected by subterranean tunnels. I was snorkling there once and could feel a very strong current trying to suck me into a cave. Weird!!

But swimming under water is not why I go to Nickerson.

There is an 8 mile paved bicycle path in Nickerson. This is great for kids and gives one a brief introduction to the park. The bike path also connects to the 22 mile long Cape Cod Rail Trail.
But they aren't the big draw either. It's the Singletracks. They abound in and around Nickerson. The DCR map only shows a few of them. But, the Cape Cod NEMBA working with the Cape Cod Chamber of commerce has come up with a complete one. The only riding restrictions are the shoreline trails that surround the three larger lakes.  (See the map above.)

Highlighting the trails are the many scenic views afforded of the park's lakes. But the most notable feature of them, to someone who normally rides off the Cape anyway, is the almost total lack of stones and rocks. The trails here define the word "buffed".

On a recent ride we did over 12 miles of mostly singletrack and didn’t have enough time to explore the entire park.

Speaking of trails. On the bottom of the Cape Cod NEMBA map you'll see a parking area at Freeman's field and below that some trails leading into the Training Loop. These trails, add about another 10 miles of mostly singletrack to the Nickerson system. Many people choose to start their rides from this location and dive right into the Training Loop. The address is 835 Freeman's Way.

How can you find these trails for yourself? Well, the Map suggests quite a few. But the best way is to join some Cape Cod NEMBA folks for a guided ride. Go to CC NEMBA’s Facebook Page, and see when the next ride is. Or, ask for guided tour. You’ll find that CC NEMBA people are very friendly, and are riding at Nickerson 3-4 times a week. 
Orleans Cycle often leads rides here too.  Check them out the next time that you're in town.

Do you recall that old Cape Cod aphorism, "Once you get the sand of the Cape in your shoes, you'll never get rid of it". Well that couldn't be more true of the sands of Nickerson State Park.

By Bill Boles
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Southeast MA

Greenough, Yarmouth

1 Ansel Hallet Rd.
Yarmouth  Massachusetts  02675
United States

Easy

30%

Moderate

60%

Difficult

10%

Description

Greenough is one of the three riding areas that make up the Willow Street complex of trails. Locals refer to all of these trails as “Exit 72” and many will choose to do an extended ride that includes trails from all three.

Greenough is located to the north of route 6 at Exit 72. The name derives from Camp Greenough a Boy Scout camp where many of the trails are located. But, Greenough’s trails extend well beyond that, reaching the ocean at Grays Beach to the north, the Badlands (Exit 75) to the west and the extensive Willow Street trails to the south of the highway.

The trails in the Scout camp are really fun, fast flowing singletracks, moderately hilly with a few technical climbs and descents. There are few rocks or exposed roots, save for the ‘black’ trail. The perimeter trails, (see map) are open all year to the general public for biking and hiking, but the trails in the center of the camp should be avoided when the Scouts are camping. Generally, that’s during the summer months.

To the north of the railroad tracks there’s a route to the aforementioned Grays Beach. This is a fun ride which goes right through the parking lot for the Yarmouthport Village Store where you can stop for refreshments. When you get to the beach there’s a long scenic boardwalk that extends well into the marsh.

There are two sections of trail on the map that are closed to bikes, Miller Pond and Camp Wingate. These trails are open to foot traffic and are included on this map so that you’ll know where you shouldn’t ride. In all there’s about 20 miles of fun riding at Greenough.

Most people choose to park just south of Exit 72 beside the railroad tracks. Just pull off the road and park in the cleared area next to the tracks.This location gives you easy access to all three of the Willow Street complex’s network of trails.

How to choose where to ride: Well, Greenough has lots of rolling hills and interesting singletracks, plenty of lake views, and even an ocean to enjoy. Higgins Crowell is mellow and flat. Lots of singletracks winding through the woods, but no hills and no technical features. It’s a great place to bring newer riders or a place to put on a lot of miles. Willow Street, behind the railroad tracks, is different. By far the hardest, there are plenty of hills and challenging singletracks. This should be your first choice if you want to work hard.

Cape Cod NEMBA works hard to keep all of these trails open, fun and deadfall free. If you’re looking for people to ride with, post a note of the CC NEMBA Facebook page.
Located in what we consider to be mid-Cape. The ‘Exit 72” trails will draw you back over and over again. Read more about [node:title]

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Southeast MA

Higgins Crowell Road, Yarmouth

Yarmouth Conservation Land

307 Higgins Crowell Road
Yarmouth  Massachusetts  02673
United States

Easy

90%

Moderate

8%

Difficult

2%

Description

Higgins Crowell is one of the three major riding areas that makes up the Willow Street complex of trails.

Of the three Higgins Crowell is the mellowest. Lots of flat singletracks flowing through the woods interspersed with an occasional jeep road. Some of the trails circumnavigate cranberry bogs while others delve so deeply into the woods that all traffic noise disappears and all you’ll hear are birdcalls or the occasional passing airplane.

There are few sandy areas, few technical obstacles and almost no hills. This makes Higgins Crowell the perfect place for a relaxing ride, a ride with newer riders or a ride with kids on small wheel bikes. But don’t get the wrong impression. These trails are not boring. They’re just flat. The singletracks running through the woods are some of the most enjoyable on the Cape.

The trails here are referred to as the Yarmouth Town Trails. Head out of the back of the parking area you’ll discover over twenty miles of riding. Some trails lead through the Horse Pond Conservation Area. While many will take you on a long journey to the west and south of the Bayberry Hills Golf Course. After some exploraton you may find yourself on a small hilltop overlooking exit ramp from Route 6.

Crossing West Yarmouth Road will bring you into more Yarmouth Conservation Land and the trails surrounding the cranberry bog to the south of Plashes Pond. Very mellow and very scenic. Occasionally you’ll spot coyotes when you look across the bogs.

Cross Buck Island Road, at the southern end of this area, and you’ll come into the Sryjala Trails Conservation area. These consist of more bog roads and some very well maintained singletracks with lots of bridges that eventually drop you out on Winslow Gray Road.

Alternatively, you could start on the trail leading into the woods on the opposite side of Higgins Crowell Road. That trail will first lead you around Sandy Pond and then, as you explore, into a vast area where the locals have developed an extensive network of trails. Some of these trails do dead end in people’s back yards, but that’s what exploring is all about. You’ll be going by a town beach on Little Sandy Pond, stop for a swim on a hot summer’s day.

Parking: From the end of the highway ramp head south on Willow Street for about ¾ of a mile. Turn left on Higgins Crowell Road and follow it for three miles until just past the Yarmouth Police Station where you’ll see a small conservation area parking lot at 307 Higgins Crowell Road.

A much larger parking area is located at the Yarmouth Dog Park, 474 Buck Island Road #452. I usually park at the treeline near the tennis courts.

Higgins Crowell is, as I mentioned, flat. But there’s a lot of riding here. Certainly too much to explore in one day. So expect to return. – Often!

Bill Boles

 

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Spring Trail Care Dates

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Please mark your calendars and join SEMASS NEMBA @ F.Gilbert Hills State Forest in Foxboro, MA for some spring cleaning and trail work. Date: Saturday April 23rd. This is a yearly spring cleanup done in partnership with other user groups ( King Philip Trail Riders, Warner Trail Hiking Club, AMC Hiking Club and the local Boy Scout Chapters).  Please bring work gloves and comfortable, sturdy footwear. Trash bags will be provided by DCR. There will also be a ride after the cleanup so bring your bike, riding gear & water.  Location: 45 Mill St., Foxboro, MA 02035. Dirt parking lot Start Time: 9:30 AM - Should be completed by noon time Date: Saturday May 14th. "Clip and Ride". Riders will be provided with pruning clippers in order to cut back those thorn bushes and other flat making, stans sealing trail hazards. The main focus of the ride will consist of cleaning up the bridal trail, the east side of Sunset Lake along Granite St. and the MTB green loop over towards Upper Dam Pond.  Location: 45 Mill St., Foxboro, MA 02035. Dirt parking lot Start Time: 9:30 AM - Should be completed by noon time Contact: Brad Childs Other SE Mass Trail Care Dates for your calendar: April 24—Wompatuck – contact: Dave Farrell April 30—Ames Nowell—contact: Malcolm Neilson May 21-22—Bear Brook Trail Builder’s School –See : http://www.nemba.org/events/new-england-trail-builders-school-bear-brook for details August 20—Wompatuck contact: Dave Farrell More details and dates will be posted stay tuned to SE Mass NEMBA facebook page!

Southeast MA

Quincy Trails

199 Merrymount Pkwy
Quincy  Massachusetts  02170
United States

Easy

70%

Moderate

25%

Difficult

5%

Description

Quincy has many choice but small riding areas. You could spend most of a day trying to ride them all. All of them are connectable by short pavement sections that we make the most of. There are ‘logs’ (curb stops) to hop, ‘trees’ (electric light poles) to dodge, and plenty of spastic squirrels to watch out for. But at the end of each paved section there’s another trail—singletrack, doubletrack, squiggly, marshy, backyard, gravelly and some even downright spooky cemetery trails. Some say night is best, some appreciate the early morning light, some prefer the trails close to the bay where the ocean breezes will provide plenty of relief during a hot summer workout.
 
There are a few ways to get to Quincy’s trails. Being an urban setting, there are plenty of MBTA buses with bike racks on them. If you live in or near Quincy, you can start your ride at home, and pickup trails along the way. Or, if you are driving from somewhere else, there are lots of parking options. Pageant Field at Merrymount Park is the best and safest place, with plenty of parking spaces when there aren’t any ball games going on there. Beechwood Knoll School is another option, when school isn’t in session. Wollaston Beach has hundreds of spaces along the sea wall and various other lots. If you’ve ridden with me in Quincy, you know where I live and are welcome to park there.
 
Here’s a brief description of a ride you can do anytime:
Black’s Creek Loop is a nice fast flat but interesting ride. Start at Beechwood Knoll School. Head east on Fenno street, or rather on the grass along Fenno, until you reach the Sailor’s Cemetery entrance. This is a peninsula that has an outer marshier loop, and an inner loop that has many little connecting trails. Do both, and you’ll log about 1.25 miles. On a hot summer day, or a cold blustery winter day, just stay there and do loops! There also is a lot of history there with the Sailors Cemetery and a neat Osprey nest built by the scouts. When you’ve seen enough there, head back out towards Fenno, but take a right into the woods before the gate. That will head you back towards the beach. Go right at Quincy Shore Drive and follow the dirt stripe until you reach Caddy Park. Another historical area with inscribed granite stones that provide info on the past. Back along the bike path, check out the tidal flood gates before heading right along Furnace Brook parkway. (At this point, you can opt to ‘drop in’ to the ‘bowl’ and grunt back up to the sidewalk) You’ll see an entrance to the woods on your right. This fun little trail will bring you back along FBP inside the guardrail. At the next intersection, go right again, and right again at the dirt parking lot. Stay right and go through the rock barriers. You’ll go through the boat ramp lot, and up the dirt road. Almost to the top of the road you’ll see a trail on the right, and a quick left. After this there are lots of little options, and some pavement to get you back to Beechwood. I won’t spoil ALL the fun, but just remember as long as the marsh is generally on your right, you can’t get lost!
 
There are LOTS more places to ride in Quincy, and hopefully I’ll have a better map put together someday. Until then, feel free to explore and, or use the SE Mass NEMBA Facebook page to contact one of us local Quincy riders to show you around!
 
Steve Cobble
 

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Southeast MA

The Badlands, Yarmouth

42 German Hill Rd
Yarmouth  Massachusetts  02675
United States

Easy

35%

Moderate

55%

Difficult

10%

Description

Exit 75 – The Badlands

Winter weary riders often travel to Cape Cod for early season riding. The Cape has much to offer. For most of the winter the Cape’s trails are snow free and dry. Then too almost every town on the Cape has at least one really good trail network to explore.  Locals know where these are but most off-Capers seem to focus on Otis in Falmouth and the West Barnstable Conservation Area in Marston’s Mills. A few will venture farther down the arm of the Cape to Nickerson State Park in Brewster, but few get to ride anyplace else.

What a shame! On route 6 alone Exit 55 & 59 lead you to Shawme Crowell State Forest in Sandwich. Exit 61 to Scudder Creek, also in Sandwich. Exit 63 to the Maple Swamp Conservation area. Exit 65 to the aforementioned West Barnstable Conservation Area. Exit 68 to the Hathaway’s Pond Conservation area in Barnstable. Exit 72 to over 50 miles of trails in Barnstable and Yarmouth at “Willow Street”. Exit 75 to “The Badlands” in Yarmouth Port. Exit 78 to the “Route 6 Trails” in South Dennis. Exit 85 to the “Test Track” and Exit 89 to Nickerson State Park.
If you’ve never heard of some of these places, but would like to explore them, and many others not mentioned here, or on the NEMBA site, Join the Cape Cod NEMBA Group Facebook page and ask a local for a tour.

To whet your whistle let’s take a look at just one of these riding gems, The Badlands.

The Badlands are located in Yarmouth Port just north of Route 6. They consist of a vast network of trails on both private and public lands. They go on for miles. The Badlands’ trails actually connect to trails leading all the way back to Maple Swamp at exit 63. That’s about 30 miles. (But we’ll save that ride for another day.)

The riding at the Badlands ranges from the sublime to the ridiculous. Many of the singletracks are smooth and flowy, completely lacking in rocks or roots as the glide up, down and around some very gentile hills.

On the other extreme, the rediculous, is the Badland Trail. Although the whole area is referred to by the locals as The Badlands, the Badland Trail itself is a deviously constructed singletrack that winds itself over and around every defilement, rock, crevice and drop that could be found at a long abandoned sandpit. You’ll know when you’re on it because it will be unlike anything else you’ve ever ridden. Ummmm – Or walked, before.

Fortunately the Badland Trail is an exception. Most of the area’s trails are quite suitable for all levels of riders though some are quite hilly. The gently rolling hills become steeper and longer as you head east and they do add up.  By the end of your ride, you'll be tired. A quick look at the map will show you that the trail network is quite convoluted. More than one day of exploring will be required to find out where they all go. 

Assisting in this is a marked portion of the Cape Cod Pathway that sort of runs from end to end and the Bud Carter trail that starts in the northeastern corner.

Weir Road, which turns into Great western Road runs through the middle of the Badlands. The trails to the east of Weir/Great Western are mostly easy and flowing with some hills. That is – except for the Badlands Trail. 

The climbs north of Weir/Great Western Road can be challenging. Especially if you’re going the wrong way on the area’s many singletracks. But they do have a purpose. At one point you’ll be at the top of an immense sand pit with an excellent view of the surrounding area. Step, or ride off the edge of the sandpit though, and it’s a long way down.

I usually choose to park near the base of German Hill Road, about 1000 feet north of Route 6 where there’s a small parking area. 42 German Hill Road, Yarmouth Port on your GPS will get you there. Though the trail starts about 500 feet before that. The main trail goes into the woods on the north side of this road. Park here and you get to ride all of the best flowy stuff before you get to the harder trails.

Alternatively you could park at 230 North Dennis Road where there’s very limited parking. This is at the start of the Bud Carter Trail. If you choose that option you’ll be starting at the low point of the area and will get some warm up climbs right off the bat.

If you’re not into exploring on your own, as I suggest above, use the Facebook option to see if you can get some locals to show you around. But, if you are exploring on your own, you won’t get too lost. Bring a copy of the map and listen. On most of the trails you can hear Route 6 traffic noise off in the distance.

Given the number of trails mentioned above, if you’re heading to the Cape this winter for a ride, why not make it a weekend mini-vacation instead of a day trip? The snow slush and mud will still be waiting for you when you get home, and don’t you deserve a break?

Oh!   And of course the trails are even better in the spring, summer and fall.   :-)
 
Bill Boles
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