Northeast MA

Northeast MA

Maudslay State Park, Newburyport

87 Curzon Mill Rd
Newburyport  Massachusetts  01950
United States

978 465-7223

Easy

80%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

5%

Description

Maudslay has wide trails for biking, walking, xc skiing, and horseback riding. It borders the Merrimac River, so you can walk or ride along the western side of the park. Best to go early in the morning. Quite a few people jog thru the park. It also has some nice hills. All the trails are well kept. They fill all holes with bark mulch. Riding is best early in the morning when the park opens at 8:00AM as that is when the trails are least crowded. The park also has a greenhouse area with a nice maze of low cut hedges, but don't ride your bike here.
There is a kettle hole area refered to as the Punch Bowl. You may notice a path which runs about a forty foot down and up. This is not a trail; it is an erosion problem caused by park users who have not stayed on marked trails. Currently, this area is fenced off for habitat restoration. The park management and NEMBA request that you never ride in any area that is not officially open to bikes.

Bike trails are marked on trail maps that are available in the brochure box by the bulletin board in the parking area and at park headquarters.

The park does not open until 8AM and closes at sunset. Anyone in the park before or after park hours is trespassing. The park is open year however from November through March, a portion of the park is closed to protect the wintering habitat of bald eagles.

Anyone violating park regulations could incur a $50 fine. The goal of the park is for the park to be enjoyed by all of our visitors and it is important for the protection of the resource and everyone's safety and enjoyment that everyone abide by the rules.

Directions:
From I95, take Exit 57 for Newburyport/Newbury onto Rt 113 East. Travel 1/2 mile and turn left onto Noble St. Follow signs to the park.

 

By David A Joaquin & Robert Kovacks Read more about [node:title]

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Northeast MA

Lynn Woods

150 Great Woods Rd.
Lynn  Massachusetts  01904
United States

Easy

20%

Moderate

20%

Difficult

60%

Description

Every local mountain biker should experience Lynn Woods! After living in the Boston Metro Area for three years, I have developed a list of thrity places within thirty minutes of the town of Arlington that I like to ride, some of them well known, many not known at all. Out of all of them, nothing is better then a day at Lynn Woods. Lynn Woods, as the name suggests, is nestled within the town of Lynn Massachusetts. For those who are unfamiliar with Lynn, it is a low income industrial town about ten miles north east of Boston. If you were to drive through the somewhat run-down center of town you would never guess that you were close to best mountain biking Massachusetts and even New England has to offer.


Lynn woods is quite large, although I am not certain, I would estimate it to be at least 2,000 acres. The park consists of three lakes, the largest of which (Walden Pond, no, not the one made famous by Thoreau), divides the reservation into two distinct sections. To the South of Walden Pond is a maze of fire roads and single-track that even after two years of riding, I still find confusing. The terrain on this side is mostly easy to intermediate, and a lot of fun to explore. For the explorer there are two places that are of particular interest; the stone tower, and Dungeon Rock. No more then a 1/4 mile from the main parking lot, directly up a long steep hill is a 5 story stone tower, built in the 1930s. From the top of this tower one can get a majestic view of the Atlantic Ocean as well as a clear shot of the Boston skyline ten miles to the south. The climb to the top can be an adventure in its self, and don't be surprised if you find a few not-so-polite local teenagers hanging out on the roof. Heading down the other side of the hill with the tower for another 1/4 mile or so you will encounter Dungeon Rock. Created by a treasure hunter in the 1800s, Dungeon Rock is cave blasted into and beneath an enormous boulder. As the legend goes pirates supposedly buried treasure underneath that rock, and some poor sap spent his entire life searching for it, by digging his way through solid rock. Although he was not successful, the treasure hunter did leave behind a very interesting piece of work. The entrance to Dungeon Rock is sealed with a cast iron door, that is supposed to be locked. However, every time I have been there the lock on the steel door was broken (probably a service provided by the same kids that hang out on t he top of the tower), and entry was possible. It's dark in there!

To the north of Walden Pond are the trails that make Lynn Woods unique. If you are new to the sport of mountain biking you probably won't want to ride on this side. To those who are experienced technical riders, you will never want to leave. The best way to describe the terrain is ROCKS! Yes everything from small loose gravel, to boulders the size of a small house. It is awesome. If you are new to this type of terrain it will take a little getting used to, but it will be worth it. Personally, I like meandering over the huge boulders that dot the landscape. For those who are interested just head up the hill towards to water tower, and follow the white dotted trail from there. The water tower can be easily seen from any clearing. This trail is nothing short of amazing. On a sunny Saturday, don't be surprised to pass fifty or more other riders in this area, it has become quite popular for good reason. Have a blast, and although it may not seem like it the first time you ride it, it is possible to ride the entire white dotted trail without falling.

Directions to Lynn Wood:
Get on I95 North. Take exit 44B for Lynn, Rt 129 East. This will dump you on a rotary, just continue to follow the signs for Rt 129 east. After you go about two more miles, a small road will go off to your right, which will be marked with a sign for the Larry Gannon Municipal Golf Course. Follow this road for about 200 yards until it dead ends into a parking lot with a baseball field on the side. This is the entrance to Lynn Woods. About 200 feet off the end of the parking lot will be the tail end of Walden Pond. To the left is the bulk of the reservation, including Dungeon Rock. To the right is the technical terrain that makes Lynn Woods awesome. Leave a lot of time and try both!

Note:

There are two maps at the top of this page.  The first is the Town's Lynn Woods map while the second focuses on the difficult "freeride trails" in the eastern section of the park.


Rules:
Mountain bikes are prohibited on trails between January 1st and April 15th.
 

Other riding near Lynn Woods:
For those who like an adventure, the fun does not end within the confines of Lynn Woods. In the past few years, I have found a way to ride primarily off road from Lynn Woods to Salem Woods, which is some five miles away. The ride inbetween is some of the most challenging terrain I have yet been on. Although I do not want to give the whole secret away, I will tell those interested how to get started. On the North side of Walden Pond there is a set of powerlines that traverse Lynn Woods, anyone who spends anytime there knows what I mean. Get on the trail underneath them and follow it out of the reservation heading AWAY from Rt 1 (be weary of kids riding motorcycles). Eventually you will hit a residential road. The powerlines will cross over that road and continue on the other side. That section is impassable, do not bother to try to ride it. Turn right on that road, then take your immediate left. Go one block and you will be on Rt 129. Turn left and you will hit the powerlines again. You will be able to pick up the trail again at that point. After about 100 yards you will be on another residential road. Turn right, go about 100 feet to the end of the road. Turn right again. Go for about 500 feet and take a left. Follow that street for about 1000 feet to the end (it is a pretty serious uphill climb). You will come to a dead end, after which will be the same powerlines again. Get back on the trail and enjoy a fun and very technical ride. This trail goes on for quite awhile. Although I am not going to give any more detailed directions, those adventurous types that are diligent in following the powerlines, will eventually hit a large (500 acres) area of wooded land owned by Eastman-Kodak. Many of the trails here have been blazed by motorcycles and you will find various downhills with banked curves (pretty scary stuff if you can keep your hands off the brakes). This place is a lot of fun! From there it is possible to take a trail that will lead in the direction of Salem woods, but that is all I am going to tell.


By Chuck Joyce Read more about [node:title]

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Northeast MA

Dow Brook Conservation Area, Ipswich

100 Mile Lane
Ipswich  Massachusetts  01938
United States

Easy

45%

Moderate

25%

Difficult

30%

Description

There are many numerous trails around the area, there is one main loop with trails verging off leading to other towns, and more trails. Right in the center of the main loop, there is a hill with three trails leading up/down it, one easy, one hard and one unrideable, going up, if you were to go down it, that's another story. The trails are nice and they meander along the town resevoirs, (swimming is prohibited) and out along numerous hills. the trails are mostly doubletrack, but offer many technical areas due to fallen trees and rocks strewn about, it's a really nice place for an afternoon ride. 


Directions:
On route 1A heading north, out of town, travel about three miles, at the intersection with Mile Lane, at the infamous "Clam Box", a really nice fried food restaurant, turn left onto Mile Lane. Park at the ballfield parking lot about 3/4 mile down Mile Lane. Ride the loop on the map and then explore the trails that you encounter.


Rules:
All trails are open to bicycles. No swimming in the resevoirs. The woods of Willowdale State forest are a short ride away behind Doyon School, on Linebrook Road.

By Jarrod Bartlett Read more about [node:title]

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Northeast MA

Harold Parker State Forest, Andover

114 Jenkins Rd
Andover  Massachusetts  01810
United States

978 686-3391

Easy

30%

Moderate

30%

Difficult

40%

Description

Harold Parker State Forest is located in the towns of Andover, North Andover, Middleton and North Reading. The forest’s 3000+ acres have over 30 miles of old woods roads and singletracks. And the singletracks are some of the most enjoyable to be experienced in the region. The white-blazed Bay Circuit Trail goes through Harold Parker and links it to the nearby Charles Ward Reservation (The Trustees of Reservations) and the Boxford State Forest.

For many years NEMBA members have been active in the forest, repairing and upgrading its trails. I start most of my rides in the eastern section of the forest on Harold Parker Road where there are numerous small parking areas. Alternatively many riders start nearer to the center of the forest at the intersection of Jenkins and Harold Parker Roads.

The Lorraine Pond campground, which has 91 sites, is also centrally located and near to most of the forest's trailheads.

At least a few days will be needed to fully explore all of the trails that Harold Parker has to offer. And I'd suggest bringing a copy of the trail map so that you won't get too badly lost. The official DCR trail map doesn't show every one of the forest's trails. But at least all of the roads and major intersections are on it.

Every year North Shore NEMBA hosts the Wicked Ride of the East at Harold Parker. This is a challenging fun event that uses many of the best trails in the forest, including many that North Shore NEMBA has had a hand in maintaining. Be sure to check out the route map for this event.

For more information on Harold Parker, including camping and swimming visit the DCR's Harold Parker Website. This website now has three maps for Harold Parker.  A general map of the forest and two maps that were generated as part of the forest's 2013 Resource Management Plan. Of the three the TrailForks map is the best.

But the best way to get introduced to Harold Parker's trails is to explore. Go there, take off on a trail, and get lost. Then find yourself, and get lost again. You'll never be too far from a paved road; so cutting the forest up into pavement encircled blocks will keep things manageable. Not to mention provide you with many days of fun exploring. I particularly like the way the singletracks make use of all of the forest's best terrain. They wind around and over all of the forests' hills and provide you with lots of scenic photo opportunities along the shores of the forest's many ponds.


If you want to sample the best of the forest’s trails without having to find them yourself try following the course on the Wicked Ride of the East event map. Or attend this year’s event.

Everyone I know who rides at Harold Parker raves about the place. The trails seem endless. The terrain ranges from smooth buffed singletracks to some of the most technical cross country trails on the North Shore.

When I ride at Harold Parker I normally do one of three rides.

For the first ride I’ll park in the dirt parking lot on the north side of Harold Parker Road just west of Collins, Brackett,  Delano and Bear Ponds. I try to ride all of the singletracks and woods roads in this area as they loop around these ponds. In doing this I do not cross any paved roads. So if you get to one, turn around and continue exploring. I don’t have a preferred route, although some of the singletracks are much more fun when ridden down than they are as uphill climbs. If I have time I’ll finish on the trails to the south of Harold Parker Road that loop around the north of Field Pond. Actually, I always have time, as these trails are among my favorite trails in the forest. If you explore the trails to the east of Field Pond you’ll find one that leads into the back of the Lorraine Pond Campground.

Another good ride option is to park at the junction of Harold Parker and Jenkins Roads. Berry Pond Road also comes into this intersection. There is a large parking area here which is located pretty much in the center of the forest. From there I’ll choose one of the many forest roads to get deeper into the forest and then dive into any of the almost uncountable number of singletrack trails that lead off from them. A particular favorite among these is the technical singletrack that branches off from Harold Parker Road, which at this point has devolved into a dirt path. About 100 yards from the parking area turn right on the first singletrack. This trail is difficult and will serve as a great warmup for all of the other similar trails that you’ll encounter. Yellow diamond blazes mark the route to and around Salem Pond. Be sure to bring a copy of at least one of the maps mentioned above, as you will get lost without one.

For a third ride I focus on the trails in northeastern third of the forest. I’ll follow Berry Pond Road from the Jenkins parking lot to the crossing of the Bay Circuit Trail, and then take a right heading north. Following the white blazes and exploring additional singletrack spits you out on Harold Parker Road near Route 114. One can retrace the route back or continue behind Stearns Pond and Salem Pond for almost a 10 mile loop. But, at the northern end of this loop there is a vast array of convoluted singletracks that are almost too much fun to believe.

Riding in Harold Parker State Forest is a constant continuing challenge. Every time I go there I am awed by the trails that I find and surprised at how much fun I have. And, depending on the trails that I ride, how difficult they are.


In the winter I’ve encountered snow frozen as hard as Styrofoam here more than anywhere else. Frozen snow covers up all the roots and rocks that normally protrude from the ground and add it tends to make your ride very fast. But fast or slow, you’ll enjoy the trails at Harold Parker State Forest.


Rules:
Expect to find hunters during hunting season in many areas of the forest. However, there is no hunting in Massachusetts on Sundays and the entire areas west of Jenkins Road in Andover and along Berry Pond Road are always closed to hunting.
The Lorraine Pond Campground is open from mid April to mid October.


Directions
From route 93 take exit 41. Follow 125 north (toward Andover), for about 4 miles to the State Police Barracks (on right). Turn right on Harold Parker Rd. There are many parking areas on this road and the Jenkins Road intersection is about one mile away. From that intersection turn right to get to the Lorraine Park Campground. Read more about [node:title]

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Northeast MA

Groton Town Forest

90 Town Forest Rd
Groton  Massachusetts  01450
United States

Easy

40%

Moderate

40%

Difficult

10%

Description

Description:


The town of Groton got its name in 1655 a few years after John Tinker set up a trading post among the Nashaway Indians near the junction of the Squannacook and Nashua rivers.


When I'm riding in the Groton Town Forest I like to think that the trails that I'm enjoying aren't very much different than the trails that these early settlers explored. And that possibly I'm on some of the same trails that these long departed settlers and Indians used for hunting, trapping, fishing and to get from one village to another. And at times, in these woods, gazing over a seemingly remote river from a high bank, you may imagine yourself back in those earlier times too.

But, those early trail users didn't have the advantages that I do mounted as I am on a mountain bike.

The trails in the Gorton Town Forest are fast, mostly smooth, sometimes sandy and sometimes hilly. They flow in and out of the woods on a series of old woods roads and singletracks. You'll frequently find yourself cresting and then riding along the ridge of a drumlin that was left there by the last glacier. But then, a few minutes later, you're riding alongside a riverbed and ducking under low hanging branches. Too hot? Why not go for a swim in that river?

In all you'll find about 14 miles of trails in the forest. Liberally apply mosquito spray if you ride in the evenings in the summer, and I suggest carrying a copy of the trail map just in case you get lost. You can get an official copy of the map at the Groton Town Hall.

There are 6.4 miles of marked trails in the forest. They form a loop and they can be ridden in both directions. The marked loop is probably the best introduction you can get to the area. It stays pretty close to the outer boundaries of the forest. On your second and subsequent loops, begin exploring some of the many side trails that branch off the main trail and, in time, you'll have ridden, and enjoyed, everything. Oh! The side trails all connect back to the marked loop, and once you learn them, you'll be able to link together any number of good rides.

One note: The Groton Town Forest lacks the stones that frequent most of the riding areas in this region. That's because the soil was deposited there as the last glacier receded. It reminds one of riding on Cape Cod.

Directions:
From route 495 take exit 31 and follow route 119 (Great Road) until it becomes Boston Road and then Main Street in Groton Center. After the center bear left on route 225 where it splits off from route 119. Follow route 225 for a little over a mile and turn left on Town Forest Road. It turns to dirt. Follow it to the end, going past all the houses and park in the dirt parking area.

Cautions:
The Groton Town Forest is surrounded by private property. Respect the rights of property owners by not riding past signs that ask you not to. In early spring the trails can be pretty muddy. Protect them by not riding here until things dry out.


By Bill Boles Read more about [node:title]

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Northeast MA

Flat Rock Hill, Dunstable

60 Mill St
Dunstable  Massachusetts  01827
United States

Easy

60%

Moderate

35%

Difficult

5%

Description

The best parking for Fllat Rock Hill is off Mill St in Dunstable. Mill Street is a short little road that starts and ends on Main St. It makes one sharp turn and right at the apex of the turn there is a sign for Flat Rock Hill. If you drive down into the field there is ample parking.

The trails at Flat Rock Hill go on for miles. Single track. Double track. Lots of flat stuff but - as the name implies - also some great hills. There are trails for all ability levels, something for everyone. Not all of the trails are on the MAP, but you'll get  in a good ride.

The backbone of the area is an old rail bed. It hasn't been converted into a bike trail, but it is pretty wide and flat. For whatever reason it hasn't been marked on the map but it runs from the Stone Arch Bridge down to Main St. The yellow and white trails run along part of it. All the easier trails lead off of it. Starting from the Mill St. parking area, if you follow the Red Trail and then the Salmon Brook trail, you'll get to the rail bed trail.

The southern end of the Salmon Brook trail looks like it ends at the brook. However, if you don't mind getting your feet wet, you can ford the brook and there are a bunch more trails on the other side. I'm not that familiar with those trails but they are probably worth a visit.

The Blanchard Hill trail (brown) is straight up/down. I think you would have to be super strong to ride up it, and super brave (i.e. crazy) to ride down it. The top of Blanchard Hill was cleared a few years ago so there is a nice view to western Mass. It's worth going up it, even if you have to (gasp) walk your bike.

The Yellow and White trails have you either going up or down. I'd say they are hard without being deadly (maybe).

The last thing I'll mention iare two more good options: Only a short road ride away is the Dunstable Rural Land Trust conservation land (marked as DRLT on the map). There's another whole network of (easier) trails there. It's listed as Fletcher Pond Trails on the NEMBA web site. From the Mill St parking area follow Mill St back to Main St, turn right, and about 3/4 mile down the road you'll see the small entrance to the DRLT on your left. It's across the street from Skytop Lane. The map shows a few different parking areas at the different entrances. The one on Mill St is the biggest. Room for everybody.

Lastly, Fletcher Pond is right across Route 111 A in Nashua New Hampshire's Yudicky Park.      Linking all three areas together would make for a really Epic Ride.

By Bill Boles Read more about [node:title]

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Northeast MA

Lowell-Dracut-Tyngsboro State Forest

126 Trotting park Rd
Lowell  Massachusetts  01854
United States

978 369-6312

Easy

20%

Moderate

60%

Difficult

20%

Description

The Lowell Dracut Tyngsboro state forest is located just minutes from the New Hampshire border and contains over 1100 acres. The trail system offers something for everyone. There are miles of fireroads and smooth rolling doubletrack for the less adventurous. The singletrack system is mountain bike specific and continues to grow. As currently configured, the singletracks will keep most intermediate riders busy for a 2 or 3 hour ride.

 

The terrain is considered gently rolling except for Whortleberry and Huckleberry Hill located in the Northern sector in Tyngsboro. The park is cut in half running North to South by Trotting Park Road, which is closed year round to traffic. Trotting Park Road is the only paved road you will find in the forest. Motorized vehicles are not allowed in the forest. But remember this forest does allow hunting during hunting season except on Sundays.

 

To the west of Trotting Park Road you will find Lake Althea and the Scarlet swamp. It is also in this area that you will find the presence of GLICA (Greater Lowell Indian Cultural Association). This group has a lease arrangement with the state for the use of this land for their cultural events. Because of this agreement, there has been very little new trail development in this area. It's important to note that this land is not off limits to the general public. This area is dominated by fireroads, doubletrack and singletrack in that order. One of the most popular trails in this area is the mile long trail put in by the AmeriCorps workers a few years back. This trail has tricky rock garden sections at both ends.

 

To the East of Trotting Park Road you'll discover the major trail system in Lowell and Dracut. This is where you will find the Spruce swamp, which is the largest swamp in the forest. Approximately half way down Trotting Park Road, on the right, you will find Carney Road. Carney Road is one of several dirt roads in the forest but is the only one that connects back to Trotting park road, and thus back to the main parking lot. It is in this eastern section of the forest that has seen most of the new trail development and trail improvements.

 

Upon exiting the AmeriCorps trail mentioned above, you can continue to follow singletrack along the Spruce swamp. This will eventually take you out to Carney Road, heading east, where after a short stretch of fire road, you can re-enter the singletrack. By following a series of new and old trails, in a clockwise direction, you will basically do a perimeter loop. Next stop along this loop is the new trail system developed out by Gumpus Road. Here you will have access to about 5 miles of new singletrack that was built primarily as mountain bike specific trails. Here you will find an assortment of rocks, drops and rolls to spice things up a bit. There are several options as to how you can connect the trails together out here to give it a different look every time you ride.

 

Continuing with the perimeter concept you will eventually make your way back to Carney Road, this time backtracking heading West. After crossing the gravel culvert, look for the fire road to the left. Turning in this direction will allow you to access a mix of old and new singletrack. There is the remnant here of an old rock quarry where three different trailheads converge. All of these trails are unique and have there own special features and are not to be missed.

 

At this point in the ride you are not far from the parking lot, or the area of the forest known as the "playground". The playground was created by the retreating Wisconsin Glacier about 15,000 years ago. Here is an assortment of rocks big and bigger that can be used to sharpen your hucking skills. From here there are several singletrack options to get back to the main parking lot on Trotting Park Road. Besides this parking area other access points are found on Gumpus Road (Lowell), Totman Road (Lowell and Dracut), Fellows Lane (Dracut), and Althea Avenue (Tyngsboro).

 

Directions:
Take Rt. 495 to Rt. 3 north. Follow Rt. 3 North to exit 32. Go right at the end of ramp, onto Drum Hill Rd. go 5 sets of lights you will cross over the Rourk Bridge. Go left at the lights on the other side of the bridge. Go 500 yards then take a right at lights onto Old Ferry Rd. Take a left onto Varnum Ave. After ½ mile, go right onto Trotting Park Rd. Parking lot is at the gate.

Cautions:
Avoid the  Greater Lowell Indian Cultural Association area when there are ceremonies going on. Be careful near the parking area as you'll see lots of families, kids and dogs.

 

By Norm Blanchette Read more about [node:title]

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Northeast MA

Dogtown, Gloucester

11 Dogtown Rd
Gloucester  Massachusetts  01930
United States

Easy

20%

Moderate

55%

Difficult

25%

Description

History
The history of Dogtown is quite extensive. It was settled in the colonial days of New England. Early settlers tried to farm the land of Gloucester, but gradually realized growing food on a landscape of rocks was more trouble then it was worth (All the better for bikers). Eventually they decided it was more advantageous to fish, and hence the residents migrated to the coastline. Supposedly after the wealthy residents moved to the shoreline, the vacated houses of Dogtown became the equivalent of a modern day ghetto, inhabited by societal outcasts and vagrants. It was during this period in the 18th century that the Dogtown acquired it's name, describing the packs of wild dogs that roamed the area.


By 1830 the entire Dogtown village was deserted. The land was then acquired by the wealthy William Babson (of Babson College fame). Mr. Babson enjoyed the land as a natural/spiritual getaway. He also liked to express his conservative viewpoints using the natural landscape. To this day many of his trite ideas are inscribed on many of Dogtown's larger boulders. Don't be surprised to happen upon a rock telling you to "GET A JOB".

Upon his death, Mr. Babson donated the land to the town of Gloucester. Now 170 years later, the area is preserved as a natural reservation. All the old houses are now gone, however the careful observer may find remnants of old cellars.

Rules & Regulations History
I spoke with the Dogtown Advisory committee. And was told that there are no restrictions on Mountain biking. All they ask is to practice common courtesy, and to keep the area clean. One note of caution is that hunting is allowed there during normal hunting season, which is primarily in autumn.


Equestrians are also very found of Dogtown. I doubt you will find any group of people more interested in banning mountain biking then equestrians. As a result do your best not to startle a horse. If you find yourself approaching or overtaking a person on a horse, get OFF your bike and announce your presence to the rider. Ask them permission to walk your bike past them.

Directions
Take 128 north towards Gloucester. Before you get into the city limits of Gloucester you will pass over a Large bridge spanning a salt water river. Shortly after you pass over this bridge, route 128 will enter a large traffic circle (Grant Circle). Follow this circle 270 degrees around and exit off on route 127 (towards Annisquam). Follow route 127 for about 1/2 mile and it will curve to the right and pass over a small bridge and some salt water. Immediately after you cross the bridge, route 127 will curve around to the left. You do NOT want to follow 127 to the left, instead look to take a right onto Reynard St. Follow Reynard to the end (1/4 mile) and turn left onto Cherry St. Look closely to your right for a small, broken-down (almost a driveway) looking road, with a small sign for Dogtown commons at the end. Follow this road to the end until you come to a gate and can not go any further.


Ride Information
Get on your bikes and continue on the road you drove in on past the metal gate for about another quarter mile. Which way you should go from here depends on your ability: The ubiquitous supply of rocks that made farming a nightmare, make mountain biking dogtown an exciting challenge. Don't let these rocks discourage you, for there is plenty of moderate terrain. I do not recommend Dogtown for first timers, although an intermediate will feel right at home. Dogtown is confusing! Unlike other places like Middlesex fells there are no trail maps waiting for you at the entrance. In fact, I am not even going to bother to explain which trails to ride the first time you get there, because Dogtown is too confusing to find these trails. I recommend first timers to bring a compass. There is different styles of riding depending on where in the park you are.


    Easy Ride
Although there is some easy terrain in Dogtown. I do not recommend first time riders going there. Dogtown is too confusing and the beginner will likely find himself lost in a maze of difficult singletrack before too long. Instead I recommend the beginner who desires to ride in the Gloucester Area to visit Ravenswood Park, which is located about 2 miles south of Gloucester center on Route 127.


    Intermediate Ride
Following your compass NNE: Here you will find your way to towards the whale's Jaw (Two extremely large boulders that supposedly resemble a Whale's Jaw. Unfortunately one broke in half, and now it just looks like one huge boulder and two smaller ones sitting next to each other) and if you diligently head due north you will come to Goose Cove Reservoir. These trails are better for the intermediate rider.


    Expert Ride
The experience rider will find enjoyable riding all over the reservation. Besides riding where the area listed in the Intermediate section I also recommend heading to the ESE corner of the reservation. You will know you are there because this is where the boulders with messages such as "GET A JOB" are located. WARNING: Do not follow the railroad tracks in this area, this is a swampy area and the mosquitoes are death.


    Getting Back To Your Car
It is actually surprisingly easy to get back to the starting point, even when you are completely lost. If you entered the reservation where I recommend then you parking the SW corner of the reservation. As a result if you follow you use you compass to head SW you are guaranteed to get back to the entrance.


If you are completely lost or broken down you are never more then 1 mile from route 127 (route 127 completely circles the Dogtown reservation). I recommend heading due west until you hit route 127, and then following 127 south until you come back to the starting point. 

 

By Chuck Joyce Read more about [node:title]

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Northeast MA

Gordon College - Chebacco Woods, Wenham

255 Grapevine Rd
Wenham  Massachusetts  01984
United States

Easy

60%

Moderate

30%

Difficult

10%

Description

Gordon College, Chebacco Woods and surrounding conservation land hold a network of trails that are little known out of the area, but well loved by the locals, including the students at Gordon College. The trails in Chebacco Woods off Chebbaco Road are well defined mostly rolling doubletracks. They are great for families with kids on small bikes as there are only a few hills. Scenery abounds in both properties. And birdwatchers are advised to bring a camera.

The Gordon College trails vary from easy flat dirt roads to challenging singletracks. The dirt roads wind around a number of ponds and are quite scenic. They would be perfect for kids on small bikes or beginning riders. The singletracks pack quite a bit of elevation change into a very small area. They twist around through the woods and leave little time for passive contemplation.

A trail Map of the area is posted on the bulletin board at the trailhead in Gordon College.


Directions
For the Gordon College trails take exit 17 from route 128 and head north on Grapevine Road. Turn into the main entrance to the college on your right and follow the campus road to the trailhead at Coy Pond.

For Chebacco Woods take exit 17 from route 128 and head north on Grapevine Road. Go past the campus turn right on Route 22 (Rubbly Road). Bear right where Rubbly Road turns to Essex Street (still on Route 22). And then take your first right on Chebacco Road. As you get to Beck Pond, on your left, you'll see a couple of pullouts where you can park for Chebacco Woods.

 

By Bill Boles Read more about [node:title]

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Ride Like a Girl Program Supports Women's Organization

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Ride Like A Girl would like to thank all of its NEMBA volunteers and clinic participants, as well as Back Bay Bicycles, Highland Mountain Bike Park, Hub Cycles, Jett Apparel, JRA Cycles, SRAM, and Wheelworks  for helping to raise $1,000.00 for the Elizabeth Stone House Wilderness Heals Hike. The donation in turn helped to offset the cost of the fundraiser hike which resulted in $20,000 in pledges going directly to the families in need! (A special thanks to Claire Grimble for keeping track of the funds!!) Be sure to keep an eye out for new Ride Like A Girl / ESH fundraiser products in the season to come, thank you for helping us help others!

—Karen Eagan Read more about [node:title]

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